French people

Summary of current events on health: the French company Carmat announces the first implant of its artificial heart in a woman; EU says people vaccinated with AstraZeneca should be able to travel to US and elsewhere

Here is a summary of the current health briefs.

French company Carmat announces the first implantation of its artificial heart in a woman

The French artificial heart manufacturer Carmat announced on Tuesday that it had carried out the first implant of its Aeson artificial heart in a woman. The company said the procedure was performed at the UofL Health – Jewish Hospital by doctors from the University of Louisville in the United States.

EU says people vaccinated with AstraZeneca should be able to travel to US

The European Commission said on Tuesday that it would make sense for the United States to allow travel for people vaccinated with AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines, although existing US guidelines already allow such travelers. On Monday, the White House announced that it will lift restrictions on EU citizens, including those fully vaccinated, from traveling to the United States from November.

Poland recommends COVID-19 booster injection for people over 50

Poland will recommend a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine for people over 50 as well as healthcare workers, a deputy health minister said on Tuesday. Waldemar Kraska said the booster would be given at least 6 months after the second injection. A third dose was already recommended earlier for the immunocompromised.

J&J says second shot increases protection against moderately severe COVID-19 to 94%

Johnson & Johnson said on Tuesday that the second injection of its COVID-19 vaccine given about two months after the first had increased its effectiveness to 94% in the United States against moderate to severe forms of the disease. This compares to 70% protection with a single dose.

Argentina Relaxes COVID-19 Restrictions, Will Facilitate Open Borders

Argentina on Tuesday unveiled plans to ease restrictions linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, including easing strict border controls, allowing more business activities and removing the mandatory wearing of face masks outdoors . Health Minister Carla Vizzotti said the relaxation of the rules would allow more economic, industrial and commercial activity in closed places, while maintaining preventive measures.

How India reversed its vaccine fortunes

Just a few months ago, India was so short of COVID-19 vaccines that computer experts wrote software code https://www.reuters.com/world/india/high-tech-hunt-scarce- covid-19-vaccines-india-raises -fear-fairness-2021-05-05 to help people grab rare immunization slots and the then health minister had to constantly grapple with criticism of opposition on social networks. The minister then resigned and entered a little-known but involved politician Mansukh Mandaviya, who, according to a person close to him, communicates almost daily with vaccine producers and tries to resolve their issues quickly.

Romania could offer third dose of Covid-19 vaccine from next week

Romania could start offering a third dose of COVID-19 vaccine to medical staff and those at risk as early as next week as the number of new daily cases increases sharply, the head of the national immunization committee said on Tuesday. Romania is behind on the European Union’s vaccination lists, with just over a fifth of the population, or 5.2 million people, vaccinated amid mistrust of state institutions.

Indian Foreign Minister urges UK to resolve COVID quarantine dispute

India’s foreign minister on Tuesday urged Britain to remove a rule requiring Indians who go there to quarantine even if they are fully vaccinated. India’s Covishield vaccine, developed by AstraZeneca and manufactured in India by the Pune-based Serum Institute, is not recognized by Britain under the new rules despite being identical to doses given to millions of Britons.

Biden calls on U.S. Supreme Court to protect abortion rights

President Joe Biden‘s administration urged the United States Supreme Court on Monday not to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade of 1973 who legalized abortion nationwide in an upcoming case involving restrictive Mississippi law. The administrative record supports Jackson Women’s Health Organization, Mississippi’s only abortion clinic, in its fight against the state’s attempt to ban the procedure after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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