French people

Macron takes oath for a 2nd term and pledges to serve everyone

French President Emmanuel Macron delivers a speech during his inauguration ceremony at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, May 7, 2022. /CFP

French President Emmanuel Macron delivers a speech during his inauguration ceremony at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, May 7, 2022. /CFP

Outgoing French President Emmanuel Macron was sworn in for his second five-year term at an inauguration ceremony at the Elysee Palace in Paris on Saturday, vowing to build a “stronger France”.

In a speech at the ceremony, Macron focused on the country’s goals, including stability in Europe, taking on global responsibilities such as security in Eastern Europe and climate change. Domestically, he called for respect for the national social contract.

“The French gave me a new mandate,” he said. “I know I have to deliver. It’s fragile confidence.”

Noting that “our values ​​of freedom” are called into question, he pledged to “serve the fatherland” and all French people.

He then received a 21-gun salute and reviewed the troops.

The inauguration ceremony of French President Emmanuel Macron is held at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, May 7, 2022. /CFP

The inauguration ceremony of French President Emmanuel Macron is held at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, May 7, 2022. /CFP

Macron, 44, won the presidential run-off with 58.55% of the vote on April 24, beating far-right candidate Marine Le Pen. He became the first French head of state in 20 years to win a second term.

Macron begins his new term in the face of various national and international challenges. The cost of living has become voters’ top priority, with sharp rises in food, energy and oil prices partly caused by post-pandemic disruptions and the Ukraine crisis.

The next big test for Macron is the parliamentary vote in June, when the 577 deputies of the lower house of the French parliament will be elected.

His centrist party, République en Marche, has changed its name to ‘Renaissance’ as it prepares for competition from a new alliance of left-wing parties led by Jean-Luc Melenchon and the far-right National Rally of Le Pen.

The name Renaissance means “always choose enlightenment rather than obscurantism”, party secretary general Stanislas Guerini said on Thursday.